Budi N

Budi N

Budi Nugroho P.

 

11
December

Mountains are vital for our lives

Almost one billion people live in mountain areas, and over half the human population depends on mountains for water, food and clean energy. Yet mountains are under threat from climate change, land degradation, over exploitation and natural disasters, with potentially far-reaching and devastating consequences, both for mountain communities and the rest of the world.

#MountainsMatter infographic

Mountains are early indicators of climate change and as global climate continues to warm, mountain people — some of the world’s hungriest and poorest — face even greater struggles to survive. The rising temperatures also mean that mountain glaciers are melting at unprecedented rates, affecting freshwater supplies downstream for millions of people. Mountain communities, however, have a wealth of knowledge and strategies accumulated over generations, on how to adapt to climate variability.

Climate change, climate variability and climate-induced disasters, combined with political, economic and social marginalization, increase the vulnerability of mountain peoples to food shortages and extreme poverty. Currently, 1 in 3 people in developing countries is estimated to be vulnerable to food insecurity.

As the vulnerability of mountain populations grows, migration increases both abroad and to urban centres. Those who remain are often women, left to manage the farms but with little access to credit, training and land tenure rights. Out-migration from mountain areas will also result in an inestimable loss in terms of provision of ecosystem services and preservation of cultural and agrobiodiversity. Investments and policies can alleviate the harsh living conditions of mountain communities and reverse out-migration trends from mountain areas.

2018 theme: “#MountainsMatter”

Even though they are mentioned in the 2030 Agenda, mountains are still often forgotten. Considering the crucial role they play in providing key ecosystem goods and services to the planet and their vulnerability in the face of climate change, we need to step up and raise attention to mountains.

#MountainsMatter for

  • Water as mountains are the world’s ‘water towers’, providing between 60 and 80 percent of all freshwater resources for our planet.
  • Disaster Risk Reduction as climatic variations are triggering disasters.
  • Tourism as mountain destinations attract around 15-20 percent of global tourism and are areas of important cultural diversity, knowledge and heritage.
  • Food as they are important centres of agricultural biodiversity and are home to many of the foods that come to our table, such as rice, potatoes, quinoa, tomatoes and barley.
  • Youth as despite the beautiful landscapes, life in the mountains can be tough, particularly for rural youth.
  • Indigenous Peoples as many mountain areas host ancient indigenous communities that possess and maintain precious knowledge, traditions and languages.
  • Biodiversity as half of the world’s biodiversity hotspots are concentrated in mountains and mountains support approximately one-quarter of terrestrial biological diversity

International Mountain Day 2018 will be an occasion to create a large social movement that can bring mountain issues on the tables of politicians. Through a global campaign, a social media strategy and events around the world, FAO plans to tell the world that the current neglect of mountains and mountain peoples must stop. We therefore ask everyone to use the hashtag #MountainsMatter in all their communications specifying why mountains matter for them. (un.org)

10
December

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights turns 70

Let's stand up for equality, justice and human dignity

Human Rights Day is observed every year on 10 December – the day the United Nations General Assembly adopted, in 1948, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This year, Human Rights Day marks the 70th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, a milestone document that proclaimed the inalienable rights which everyone is inherently entitled to as a human being -- regardless of race, colour, religion, sex, language, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. It is the most translated document in the world, available in more than 500 languages.

Drafted by representatives of diverse legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration sets out universal values and a common standard of achievement for all peoples and all nations. It establishes the equal dignity and worth of every person. Thanks to the Declaration, and States' commitments to its principles, the dignity of millions has been uplifted and the foundation for a more just world has been laid. While its promise is yet to be fully realized, the very fact that it has stood the test of time is testament to the enduring universality of its perennial values of equality, justice and human dignity.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all. The principles enshrined in the Declaration are as relevant today as they were in 1948. We need to stand up for our own rights and those of others. We can take action in our own daily lives, to uphold the rights that protect us all and thereby promote the kinship of all human beings. 

 

Human Rights and the Sustainable Development Goals

Human rights are at the heart of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), as in the absence of human dignity we cannot drive sustainable development. Human Rights are driven by progress on all SDGs, and the SDGs are driven by advancements on human rights. Find out how UN agencies strive to put human rights at the centre of their work. (un.org)

09
December

Every year $1 trillion is paid in bribes while an estimated $2.6 trillion are stolen annually through corruption – a sum equivalent to more than 5 per cent of the global GDP. In developing countries, according to the United Nations Development Programme, funds lost to corruption are estimated at 10 times the amount of official development assistance.

Corruption is a serious crime that can undermine social and economic development in all societies. No country, region or community is immune. This year UNODC and UNDP have developed a joint global campaign, focusing on how corruption affects education, health, justice, democracy, prosperity and development.

The 2017 joint international campaign focuses on corruption as one of the biggest impediments to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

06
December

 

Today and tomorrow, December 6 and 7, ten ministers and a head of state (from Nauru), will attend the Bali Democracy Forum- BDF 2018. This year the annual event, held  by the Indonesian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, enters its 11th year.

The years 2017 and 2018 are special because Indonesia managed to open two BDF Chapters, one for Africa in Tunisia and one for Europe in Berlin, Germany. These two Chapters or branches were formed because of the interest of countries in Africa and Europe in the dialogue surrounding the challenges of contemporary democracy which have apparently increased. However, the type of problem handling cannot be the same because each continent has a different history of problems.

Europe for example, discussed the challenges of contemporary migration and how democratic values can prioritize humanity and human rights although political and social costs cannot be fully predicted. While in  Africa, the issue is fair governance.

This year the Bali Democracy Forum is themed, "Democracy and Welfare." Most countries in the world consider democracy to be the best system of hope. How do democratic countries achieve prosperity? Maybe that will be discussed by participants in the Bali Democracy Forum in two days.

Indeed,  the purpose a country is established is for the welfare of its people. In the Democratic system the state is managed with inclusive participation from the community. In this case the democratic system must also be able to answer aspects of the state's goals, namely welfare.

Every democratic country has its own experience in developing democracy. Democracy grows and develops in each country in a different way. Therefore, there is actually no similar democracy formula that can be applied in all countries.

For eleven years Indonesia has been successfully  organized the forum for democracy. Not to patronize other countries on  how to practice  democracy, but to provide opportunities for various countries to share democratic experiences. Hopefully the Bali Democracy Forum 2018 will also be a  success.